Devin (canariesrise) wrote,
Devin
canariesrise

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How Do You Say 'Gangsta' In Spanish?

Some more explorations inspired by SYTYCD. I was just doing some late night internet explorations, and I thought I'd journal a bit, in my never ending quest to pass on knowledge to anyone who cares. Which is think is no one, but anyway. Some general and only somewhat random musings on music, language, and prison life below the cut.

As you will all know if you read my post about the season finale of SYTYCD, they redid a bunch of the best routines of the season. This included Lauren and Pasha's hip hop routine, which I definitely liked a lot the first time I saw it. At the end of the season, however, I think I appreciate it even more. I tend to get excited when the do hip hop on the show, because there's a chance that its a really cool song and just generally I'm very agreeable to it. On many occasions, I am, nonetheless, let down by what happens. Lots of times they pick a bad song, or I just don't like the dance, or one of the dancers fall downs on the job (not literally) or otherwise I just don't get too excited. Dominic and Sabra did a hip hop routine which also made it into the choreographer/judge's picks, but I didn't like it quite as much as this one. Lacey and Kameron also did one a liked a lot, but Kameron was so bad that I think the only reason I really liked it was because Lacey was her awesome Lacey self. Let me just look around and see who else to stuff to see if that jars my memory... Never mind actually, I'll never finish this. If it wasn't memorable, it just wasn't. I did, however, come across Benji and Natalie from last season doing hip hop to a Pitbull song (which is ironic, as you'll see in a moment). All I can say is Benji could never look tough in a million years. 
So anyway, not only was Lauren and Pasha's routine cool because Lauren danced it fantastically and Pasha kept up for the most part (which was a tall order), but the routine and the song were totally awesome. It was often referred to as the "transformer" inspired piece, and, after listening to a clip of the song on iTunes, its apparent that there were mechanical sounds added to the song (and the song was otherwise remixed) which makes the clip the dance to sound amazing. (I just finished watching another clip where it was more than obvious that they had added sound effects, so they probably do this a lot for hip hop.) Anyway, I'm not going to waste time talking about the routine too much. I loved it, and I've been watching it a bunch over the past few days. So here a link! Yay for linkage!
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8445592623709958394&q=lauren+pasha+hip+hop&total=36&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=4
Watch if you're interested, if you're not, that's not really the point of this anyway. 
Anyway, I noticed that the song, whose English lyrics were barely understandable (shock, shock) switched to Spanish halfway through. In curiousity to see what he was saying, I googled the lyrics. Surprising (apparently not all Americans are totally ignorant, or there are more Latinos than i thought), i found a site (first one too!) where the spanish hadn't been translated. What became evident to me very, very quickly, is that I may actually have more ease discerning the Spanish from the English in this case. The spanish was, after a five minute review, generally very proper (not that I'm fluent yet) and had some colloquiallisms, but it was nowhere near as bad as the English parts in that respect. So, now, I'm going to take a look at what's in this song, and see what I find. Then, for fun, I'm going to look up and English translation (for the Spanish parts at least) and see what I missed. I'm such a dork, I think this is fun! Oh, and just a note:

I have, in my lifetime, been very frustrated with people who hate to study foreign language. Right now, my mind is jumping to a girl who I had spanish class with in middle school, who kept trying to write all her papers in english and then just feeding them to her computer's translator. She actually didn't understand, not that she was simply too lazy, but she really didn't understand that you could not translate word for word. I've actually encountered sever people like that, and they make me want to pull my hair out. I really do hope, maybe with this small little exercise, that I can impart on people like them that translation requires patience and flexibility and it is a difficult task. But if you like to think creatively and love that "aha" moment, like I do, its something fun to try. (Btw, my notes are in dark red here!)

Pitbull Fuego Lyrics

Oh, I already see what it is
He thinks he's a gangsta
Mr. CallaPark [Repeating] (Okay, I already feel like I need a translator...The first two lines make relative sense to me, a basic statement of "I recognize the problem with him, His arrogance/attitude" but I really have no idea what this reference in the third line is. I guess I should make note that I really am at a disadvantage because my life is so far removed from the topics of this song, so I'll probably miss this meaning of a ton of things.)

You think you gangsta cause you did time
Well listen here gangsta, don't cross the line
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!) (A fun exercise here with the Spanish. Literal, word for word translation: Have (plural informal command) care with the fire. A little smoother: Be careful (you have to know the verbal construction "tener cuidado" really means "to be careful") with the fire. Final translation: This is kind of awkward, I'm not really sure how you would say it in English, it could be only "Be careful with the fire." Or, you might clarify with "Be careful near/around the fire." To say the last in spanish would almost certainly be too wordy to attempt.)
Ten cuidado con el fuego
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego

Beamers and impala's
Thugs and them ballers
Ain't nothing safe
When them things start (jigga jigga jigga jigga jigga)
Look man, keep thinking we shook man
Do 'em like Bethune and Cookman
You ain't ready for them things to (jigga jigga jigga jigga jigga)
Look chump, you really think you live?
Then we can take this thing outside
Pop the door, pop the trunk
And let them things (jigga jigga jigga jigga jigga) (This stanza is sort of a big blur of confusion for me, but I get the general idea that he is saying that their ("the (true) gangsta's") life is chaotic/stressful. He seems to be warning the listener against the delusions he may have about this lifestyle and his ability to cope with it. He then challenges to prove his ability to cope.)

You think you gangsta cause you did time
Well listen here gangsta, don't cross the line
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego

Si me van a tirar, tiren bien (Here Devin had to pop out her dictionario, forgot what "tirar" means. In the dictionary, there are several fitting denotations. Tirar can mean to pull, to attract, to throw, or even to shoot. Before I get to drawing any conclusions, I'll just say the line means: If you (still addressing as a plural) are going to ____________ me, __________ well. The first blank is a verb, the second the command form of the verb, which would actually sound the the same to us in English)
A mi no me importa quien (To me, it doesn't matter who)
Un consejo que lo piensen bien (A piece of advice, that you may consider it well. Can't you tell a 50 year old lady taught me how to do this. It is hard to translate subjunctive without sounding contrite, though.)
Ten cuidado que yo vengo a cien, preparate (A number of points of confusion in this line too. First try: "Be careful that I come to 100, prepare yourself."
Problems:
1. "que yo vengo": when I first read this, I sort of jumped ahead and assumed that it meant: be careful that I don't come..., but upon looking at the fact that the indicative is used it seems to point that it is fact. If this were true, the "que" seems to be awkward, but that could easily be a result of my lack of familiarity with the language. [Cannot find any wisdom in the magic verb book either.] So I guess my final conclusion is that he's saying, Be careful because I come/will come...
2. "vengo a cien": originally I had no idea what "come to 100" could mean, so I looked up venir in my diccionario and found that it not only means "to come" but can also mean to be of interest/to concern. Therefore, he may be saying, there are 100 people concerned about him (bad odds indeed). However, I may be wrong, because in normal cases, not that I've ever seen this expression, but I would guess that this would require an indirect object pronoun, which is missing. 
3. Preparate: Suddenly, he started speaking to a singular audience. Here I think the decision may have been stylistic. To be grammatically correct, he would have had to say, "preparaos" (which is impossible to say without even trying to rap it) or "preparense", which has a much softer sound, and definitely wouldn't sound quite as good. 
So, my final, smooth as possible translation:
Be careful because I have a hundred friends, prepare yourself.)

Yo no juego juegos (I don't play games. Which sounds a lot cooler in spanish, actually)
Lo unico que tengo es mi palabra y los dos huevos (All I have is my word and the two eggs. So...what ARE the eggs? I did check the dictionary, no hidden meanings there. As I said before, i don't know my colloquialisms, especially of the prison sort. My only guess is that he's referring to balls, but I don't really know.)
So respeten el movimiento (Don't know how much I trust this write up, but I think they may have meant "Solo" instead of "so". In that case, we're looking at "Just repeat the movement." Or, "So repeat the movement" if we're doing spanglish.
Oye y deja el invento, penco (Listen up and stop inventing, you nag. Yes, I had to look up "penco")
Mira papo lo siento (Look here, "double chin" I'm sorry)
Pero la verdad es que ellos no pueden con esto (But the truth is the they can't with this. Its sounds like I've left out a word, but the construction makes more sense in spanish and it really sounds fine (at least to me) without it. In english, I'm guessing you might say, They can't cope/deal/keep up with this.)
Y si tu creen que lo tienen bien puesto (We'll have to see what I see on other sites, but this doesn't make sense the way its written. It would either have to be "te creen" and if they believe that they have it well placed. Or it could be "Tu crees" so that it would be And if you think that they have it well placed. the translation of "puesto" is a little tough here, placed was the best I could do. I'm getting tired.)
Entonces ponte apuesto (Quite a quandry here. "apuesta" means bet/wager. "apuesto" means handsome, which doesn't seem to fit. I'll guess another mistake and say "Then put your money where you mouth is" to use a cliche.

Dale!  (Come on [more or less])

You think you gangsta cause you did time
Well listen here gangsta, don't cross the line
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego 

I'll blow yo lights out
Them Dade County boys ride chevy's with the pipes out
And they quick to put the pipe out
My question is: ?Who the f**k wanna fight now??
When you ride by the blocks in Opa-Locka all they scream is ?Yayo Yayo!?
Este cubanito no es Willy Chrino pero ya el llego, llego
This my time, my time
My turn, my turn
My grind, my grind
If you think it's a game, play with it right

You think you gangsta cause you did time
Well listen here gangsta, don't cross the line
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego

You think you gangsta cause you did time
Well listen here gangsta, don't cross the line
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego
Ten cuidado con el fuego (It'll burn you!)
Ten cuidado con el fuego

You think you gangsta cause you did time
Well listen here gangsta, don't cross the line

Mr. CallaPark [Repeating]

If you think it's a game, play with it right...

Ain't nothing safe when them guns start... 

Okay, I'm too tired to bother with this whole English-ish nonesense. Let's get ot the fun part. Just a review. Here's my translation of the spanish stanza. 

Si me van a tirar, tiren bien If you're going to challenge me, make it good
A mi no me importa quien To me, it doesn't matter who
Un consejo que lo piensen bien A piece of advice, that you may consider it well. 
Ten cuidado que yo vengo a cien, preparate Be careful because I have a hundred friends, prepare yourself.
Yo no juego juegos I don't play games. 
Lo unico que tengo es mi palabra y los dos huevos All I have is my word and my balls
So respeten el movimiento So repeat the movement
Oye y deja el invento, penco Listen up and stop inventing, you nag. 
Mira papo lo siento Look here, "double chin" I'm sorry
Pero la verdad es que ellos no pueden con esto But the truth is the they can't keep up with this. 
Y si tu creen que lo tienen bien puesto And if you think that they have it well placed
Entonces ponte apuesto Then put your money where your mouth is.
Dale!  Come on!

So, let see what it actually means... 
Oh, nargles! I can't find a translation! Have to make it a project for another time.
Tags: music, spanish, sytycd
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